Archive for the ‘FAQ’ Category

Why “Free Is a Verb”?

For one, we’re not politicians, activists, law enforcement, or businesspeople–we’re writers, and that is the main skill we’re bringing to this cause. But second, and most importantly, we want to promote action both locally and abroad, because that’s what it will take to end modern-day slavery.

 

What am I donating to?

All of our work in the Philippines will be volunteer, so you will be supporting us for the 12 months we are there. We’re volunteering with Samaritana Transformational Ministries, and International Justice Mission (IJM).  Samaritana does some amazing aftercare work, helping prostituted women build a new life and providing them with counseling, livelihood skills (and a new way to make a living), scholarship programs for their children, and a loving, accepting Christian community.  IJM works to prosecute traffickers, rescue victims of trafficking, and place those victims in aftercare facilities like Samaritana.

Fight human trafficking from the comfort of your own wallet!

Are donations tax-deductible?

Yes.  Prior to our departure for Manila, our fundraising was with the Joyce Family Foundation, a 501(c)(3) non-profit set up for supporting charitable work. The tax ID # is 41-6378114.  While in the Philippines, we are working under the umbrella of Converge Worldwide.

What is your budget, and how are you planning to cover your expenses?

Our budget for a year in the Philippines is approximately $40,000.  The Fulbright scholarship will provide $11,000, but the remainder we need to address with a combination of our savings and donations.  We’ve saved enough money over the last seven years to cover our California mortgage while we’re gone, and to cover personal expenses during our year away.

How else can I help?

You can volunteer locally with any of the organizations listed in the sidebar, or donate to them. Please visit their respective web sites for more information.

You can also spread the word about human trafficking to everyone you know!  We’re continually amazed by how many people in our lives don’t know about it, and humbled by how long it took us to learn about it ourselves.